Five things you should be listening to this weekend (Vol. 40)

This Sunday sees some of the biggest names in music get together for the 59th annual Grammy Awards. Which means my Monday will be spent catching up on the highlights, seeing if Chance the Rapper managed to make history again. Anyway, you didn’t come here for Grammy talk, you came here for some new music. Here are my five things you should be listening to this weekend.

 

Sampha – (No One Knows Me) Like the Piano

Finally, after years of waiting, Sampha released his debut album this week. Process is a fantastic, complex piece of work, with Sampha working through a range of emotions. Like The Piano, a heartfelt tribute to his late mother, is a stand out track.

Syd – All About Me

Another debut album this week came from Syd, of The Internet and Odd Future fame. Fin sees Syd break out on her own, moving away from the neo-soul feel of The Internet’s Ego Death. There are plenty of late 90s r’n’b influences that can be felt throughout the album, but Syd puts her unique stamp on each and every track.

Stormzy – Big For Your Boots

This week saw Stormzy announce his long-awaited debut album, Gang Signs and Prayer, set to be released on 24th February. As if this wasn’t enough, he also released the video for Big for Your Boots, the album’s lead single. The track bangs and shows Stormzy is still on the top of his game. The video was directed by Daps, who’s recently worked on Migos’s Bad and Boujee and T Shirt videos, and sees Stormzy chilling in Morley’s with Maya Jama.

Thundercat – Show You The Way (Feat. Michael McDonald and Kenny Loggins)

Show You The Way came out at the end of January, along with the announcement for Thundercat‘s third album, Drunk. Drunk’s tracklist includes feature spots for Kendrick Lamar, Wiz Khalifa and Pharrell, but Show You The Way tops it all by bringing in Kenny Loggins. Danger Zone.

Loyle Carner – The Isle of Arran

The Isle of Arran is the opening track from Loyle Carner’s debut album, Yesterday’s Gone, and sets the tone for the rest of the record. The album showcases Carner’s unique style of music, with old school soul and jazz-infused beats providing the perfect accompaniment to his mellow, laid back lyrical style.

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